The Complete Retirement Planner Blog

The Impact Of A Higher Inflation Rate For Health Care Costs

While you're still working, your employer generally helps cover at least part of your health care insurance/costs (hopefully!). But the moment that you stop working, you'll be responsible for the entire cost. If you retire before age 65, you will pay full market rates in your area for all health insurance and related costs. The total cost of this coverage could be a far greater than you expect, and you would be wise to research those costs as you create a reliable retirement plan, and before making the decision of when to retire.   Once you are age 65, you...

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It's A New Year - Plan Your Own Path

The beginning of every year seems to be a popular time for reporters to write about retirement planning, and all the steps you should be taking to get yourself into a better financial position. The problem is that all the advice they are offering is exactly the same generic advice they were offering last year. And the year before, and all the years before that. While it may be true that the basic principles of financial planning do not change in any significant way from one year to the next (aside from tax laws and retirement account contribution limits), telling...

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The Rule of 72

No, the Rule of 72 has nothing to do with your age, or Required Minimum Distributions (which start at age 70 1/2 and involve taking distributions from taxable retirement accounts). Long before you start taking money out of your savings, you will be deciding how much money you need to put in to save enough for a comfortable retirement. More importantly, you will probably want to know how long it may take to achieve your savings goal. That's where this rule comes in handy.The Rule of 72 helps you to quickly estimate how long it will take for your money...

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Why Should You Pay For A Retirement Planning Tool?

If you've ever tried to create a retirement plan, you already know how complex it is to try to account for decades of personal financial variables, taxes, potential pitfalls, life changes, predicting the future, etc. Unless you're a whiz at building financial planning tools, it will likely end up being an exercise in frustration. To figure it all out correctly, most people need a little help in the form of a comprehensive planning tool. If you can find one. There are hundreds of free retirement calculators available across the internet, mostly found on financial sites. Most will ask you a...

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Just How Costly Is A Little "Bad" Debt?

While being "in debt" often has negative implications, not all debt is construed as being harmful to your financial situation. Different types of debt are often referred to as, "good" debt, or "bad" debt. Having a mortgage (that you can really afford) is considered to be "good" debt because it can be beneficial in the long run. A mortgage pays for an asset that is expected to gain in value, you are paying a relatively low interest rate, it can provide certain tax deductions, and it is an expense that you would have anyway (at least in part) even if...

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